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Hostess to Sell Wonder Bread to Tastykake Parent

Hostess to Sell Wonder Bread to Tastykake Parent

Wonder Bread will live on after Hostess bankruptcy

The bankruptcy of Hostess left many Americans convinced that their favorite snacks would be gone forever. Those who were particularly attached to the fluffy white Wonder Bread can rest easy tonight knowing that brand has been saved from extinction by a sale to Thomasville, Ga.-based Flower Foods.

Flower Foods, the maker of Tastykakes, already has its own bread lines, including Nature’s Own and Cobblestone Mill. According to the Associated Press, the company offered $360 million for Wonder, Nature’s Pride, Butternut, Home Pride, and Merita, and $30 million for Beefsteak. The offer has been accepted as a "stalking horse bid," which means Flower gets to make the first offer, but higher bids can still be made and the final deal will have to be approved by bankruptcy court. According to Forbes, Flower Foods would receive a break-up payment if the brands wound up going to another bidder.

According to Hostess, its bread brands accounted for nearly $1 billion in sales last year. Half of that was thanks to Wonder Bread.

Everyone who is more interested in sugary packaged snacks will just have to sit tight. Those probably aren’t going anywhere either. According to AP, Hostess is expected to announce a buyer and/or buyers for its dessert products in the coming weeks.


The iconic bread brand returned to store shelves Monday, said Flowers Foods ( FLO ) , the company that snatched it up earlier this year along with most of the other breads from the now-defunct Hostess for $360 million.

Flowers said Wonder and other former Hostess brands like Merita and Home Pride would be available throughout its delivery markets, which encompass roughly 77% of the U.S. population. The bread is being packaged with a retro logo from Wonder's early days.

"We are using the same recipes and paying close attention to quality and freshness," Keith Aldredge, Flowers' vice president of marketing, said in a statement.

Flowers also produces Tastykake snacks and Nature's Own bread.

The news comes months after a bankruptcy judge approved the sale of Wonder, Twinkies and other assets from Hostess Brands.

Former Hostess snack brands like Twinkies, Ho Hos and Ding Dongs were sold for $410 million to a joint venture of private equity firms Apollo Global Management ( APO ) and Metropoulos & Co. Twinkies resumed sales in July.

Hostess suspended production in November of last year, moving to liquidate after years of financial distress and a failure to reach a new contract with its bakers' union.

The demise of Hostess led fans of the company's products to quickly scoop them up at grocery stores, fearing that they would never be able to purchase them again.

But it was always widely expected by analysts that Hostess would be able to sell its most popular brands to other food makers through the liquidation process.


WSJ says Hostess in talks to sell bread brands

NEW YORK (AP) -- The makers of Thomas' English muffins and Tastykake snacks are emerging as the two of the bidders for Wonder Bread and other Hostess bread brands as the company tries to sell off its assets under bankruptcy-court oversight, a newspaper reported Saturday.

The Wall Street Journal said Hostess Brands Inc. could reveal as early as next week that Flowers Foods Inc. and Grupo Bimbo SAB are in discussions to acquire the bread brands, which also include Nature's Pride. The report said the brands could command $350 million.

Grupo Bimbo's brands include Arnold breads, Thomas' English muffins and Entenmann's cakes. Flowers Foods Inc.'s brands include Nature's Own breads and Tastykake snacks.

Hostess sells Twinkies, Ding Dongs and Ho Hos, along with Dolly Madison cakes, which includes Coffee Cakes and Zingers. Hostess also sells Devil Dogs, Funny Bones, and Yodels under the Drake's brand.

Hostess, which is based in Irving, Texas, announced in November that it was shutting down its business and selling its bread, snacks and cakes brands along with its 33 bakeries and other operations.

The company's demise came after years of management turmoil and turnover. Workers said the company failed to invest in updating its snack cakes and breads. Hostess filed for its second Chapter 11 bankruptcy in less than a decade last year, citing steep costs associated with its unionized workforce.

The company was able to reach a new contract agreement with its largest union, the Teamsters, but the bakers union rejected the terms and went on strike Nov. 9. A week later, Hostess announced its plans to liquidate, saying the strike crippled its ability to maintain normal production. In 2011, the company's revenue was $2.5 billion.

Hostess declined to comment, as did Grupo Bimbo's U.S. division, Bimbo Bakeries USA. Bimbo's parent company is headquartered in Mexico. A message left with Flowers Foods, which is based in Thomasville, Ga., was not immediately returned.

Hostess said in bankruptcy court proceedings in December that it was narrowing down the bids it had received and that it expects to sell off its snack cakes and bread brands to different buyers.

Hostess said in December that it expects to file binding bids for many of its brands this month, followed by a four-week auction process to allow competing bids. Closings for many brands could come as soon as mid-March, according to Joshua Scherer of Perella Weinberg Partners, which is advising Hostess.

An attorney for Hostess said in court in December that 1,100 employees had been retained to shut down plants and perform other tasks as it winds down its operations. The liquidation of the company will ultimately mean the loss of 18,000 jobs, not including those shed in the years leading to the company's failure.

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WSJ: Hostess in talks to sell bread brands

NEW YORK (AP) — The makers of Thomas' English muffins and Tastykake snacks are emerging as the two of the bidders for Wonder Bread and other Hostess bread brands as the company tries to sell off its assets under bankruptcy-court oversight, a newspaper reported Saturday.

The Wall Street Journal said Hostess Brands Inc. could reveal as early as next week that Flowers Foods Inc. and Grupo Bimbo SAB are in discussions to acquire the bread brands, which also include Nature's Pride. The report said the brands could command $350 million.

Grupo Bimbo's brands include Arnold breads, Thomas' English muffins and Entenmann's cakes. Flowers Foods Inc.'s brands include Nature's Own breads and Tastykake snacks.

Hostess sells Twinkies, Ding Dongs and Ho Hos, along with Dolly Madison cakes, which includes Coffee Cakes and Zingers. Hostess also sells Devil Dogs, Funny Bones, and Yodels under the Drake's brand.

Hostess, which is based in Irving, Texas, announced in November that it was shutting down its business and selling its bread, snacks and cakes brands along with its 33 bakeries and other operations.

The company's demise came after years of management turmoil and turnover. Workers said the company failed to invest in updating its snack cakes and breads. Hostess filed for its second Chapter 11 bankruptcy in less than a decade last year, citing steep costs associated with its unionized workforce.

The company was able to reach a new contract agreement with its largest union, the Teamsters, but the bakers union rejected the terms and went on strike Nov. 9. A week later, Hostess announced its plans to liquidate, saying the strike crippled its ability to maintain normal production. In 2011, the company's revenue was $2.5 billion.

Hostess declined to comment, as did Grupo Bimbo's U.S. division, Bimbo Bakeries USA. Bimbo's parent company is headquartered in Mexico. A message left with Flowers Foods, which is based in Thomasville, Ga., was not immediately returned.

Hostess said in bankruptcy court proceedings in December that it was narrowing down the bids it had received and that it expects to sell off its snack cakes and bread brands to different buyers.

Hostess said in December that it expects to file binding bids for many of its brands this month, followed by a four-week auction process to allow competing bids. Closings for many brands could come as soon as mid-March, according to Joshua Scherer of Perella Weinberg Partners, which is advising Hostess.

An attorney for Hostess said in court in December that 1,100 employees had been retained to shut down plants and perform other tasks as it winds down its operations. The liquidation of the company will ultimately mean the loss of 18,000 jobs, not including those shed in the years leading to the company's failure.


Wonder bread back in stores

NEW YORK Wonder bread is back almost a year after it vanished from shelves.

Flowers Foods Inc., which bought Wonder from the now-defunct Hostess Brands, says the bread started returning to supermarket shelves Monday.

The company, which also makes Tastykake and Nature's Own bread, snapped up five bread brands after Hostess went out of business late last year. The $355 million deal included Butternut, Home Pride and Merita, which are all returning to shelves along with Wonder.

Keith Aldredge, vice president of marketing at Flowers Foods, says the company is still deciding the fate of the Nature's Pride bread brand.

The demise of Hostess Brands, which had been troubled by years of management turmoil, sparked an outpouring of nostalgia for treats such as Twinkies, Ding Dongs and Ho Hos. Soon after the company said it was shutting down its factories last November, people headed to shelves and wiped out supplies of Twinkies and other cakes.

Flowers is apparently hoping to tap into that nostalgia.

Aldredge said the company decided to go back to retro packaging for the relaunch of Wonder bread. He also said Flowers decided to use a Wonder recipe from "an earlier time," although he could not provide details on what that meant or how the bread would be different from what was on shelves most recently.

Despite the nostalgia certain brands may evoke, it's not unusual for companies to tweak recipes and ingredients over time. The Twinkies on shelves today, for example, have a shelf life of about 45 days, which is nearly three weeks longer than a year ago.

Flowers said Wonder bread is being made at that company's existing plants. The 20 Hostess plants the company acquired as part of the deal were closed, Aldredge said.

The company says the bread is being distributed in the areas where Flowers currently distributes its products, with hopes of expanding over time.

Flowers Foods, based in Thomasville, Ga., says it reaches about three quarters of the country.

First published on September 23, 2013 / 3:47 PM

© 2013 The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.


How Much Is Twinkies Worth?

The iconic brand is still on the market and will likely be sold in a matter of weeks. But what's its true value?

Related

Last week, Flowers Foods, maker of Nature’s Own bread and Tastykake snacks, emerged as the leading bidder for a number of brands being sold by bankrupt bread maker Hostess. The $360 million proposal includes Wonder Bread, Butternut, Home Pride, Merita, and Nature’s Pride brands, along with a separate $30 million deal for Beefsteak bread.

But one notable Hostess product isn’t part of the deal: Twinkies.

This is somewhat surprising, because when Hostess announced late last year that it would liquidate, the outcry from American consumers focused almost exclusively on the iconic, cream-filled, golden snack cake. Within days, Twinkies started disappearing from store shelves and going for record prices on the secondary market. Suddenly, it seemed, Americans wanted Twinkies again.

As it turns out, several large corporations are rumored to be eyeing Twinkies, and it’s thought that the company will likely be sold in a matter of weeks. Among the interested parties are reported to be Grupo Bimbo, the baking giant that owns Sara Lee, Entenmann’s, and Thomas’ English Muffins, among other brands supermarket chain Kroger and Walmart.

But how much is this iconic brand really worth? Twinkies doesn’t have the market reach it once had, after all. That’s partly because Hostess failed to innovate as Americans gradually shifted their eating habits and went looking for healthier and healthier-seeming products. Long gone are the days when most American parents can drop a Twinkie into a child’s sack lunch and feel they are rounding out a balanced meal by doing so. That said, there is still good money to be made producing guilty pleasures: Hostess baked about 500 million Twinkies last year, according to company spokesperson Lance Ignon, bringing in about $74 million.

“The value of a brand is what the company that acquires it decides to do with it,” says Alexander Chernev, a marketing professor at Northwestern’s Kellogg School of Management, who recently blogged about the brand’s future. If, for example, a corporation decides to acquire Twinkies merely to keep selling the same product to the same retailers in the same locations, then the winning bid may not be much – likely less than $50 million, Chernev predicts.

On the other hand, he says, if a company with experience reviving flagging but iconic brands decides to bid — perhaps deciding that the Twinkies brand can be made bite size, or turned into a new line of ice cream products — then the winning bid will likely be higher.

Robert Passikoff, founder and president of research firm Brand Keys, says that Twinkies can be compared to Flower Foods’ Tastykakes brand, which is a similar product but not as well known. Flowers paid $34 million for the brand in 2011, and Passikoff believes that if you balance Twinkies’ more expansive cultural reach with its slightly smaller distribution compared to Tastykakes, Twinkies is likely to go for something in that ballpark. “You could say the range of products and a certain broader demographic appeal for Tastykakes is balanced out by Twinkies’ cultural importance and resonance,” says Passikoff.

Either way, Twinkies’ new owner will likely control not just the brand but also its manufacturing and distribution outlets, which are immediate and reliable pipelines to consumers who still buy up the snack.

It’s long been said that their long shelf lives make Twinkies one of the few things that could survive a nuclear attack. The question for the brand’s potential bidders is whether the brand can survive changing consumer tastes — and a trip through bankruptcy court.


Wonder bread returning to shelves

Wonder bread is back almost a year after it vanished from shelves.

Flowers Foods Inc., which bought Wonder from the now-defunct Hostess Brands, says the bread started returning to supermarket shelves Monday.

The company, which also makes Tastykake and Nature's Own bread, snapped up five bread brands after Hostess went out of business late last year. The $355 million deal included Butternut, Home Pride and Merita, which are all returning to shelves along with Wonder.

Keith Aldredge, vice president of marketing at Flowers Foods, says the company is still deciding the fate of the Nature's Pride bread brand.

The demise of Hostess Brands, which had been troubled by years of management turmoil, sparked an outpouring of nostalgia for treats such as Twinkies, Ding Dongs and Ho Hos. Soon after the company said it was shutting down its factories last November, people headed to shelves and wiped out supplies of Twinkies and other cakes.

Flowers is apparently hoping to tap into that nostalgia.

Aldredge said the company decided to go back to retro packaging for the relaunch of Wonder bread. He also said Flowers decided to use a Wonder recipe from "an earlier time," although he could not provide details on what that meant or how the bread would be different from what was on shelves most recently.

Despite the nostalgia certain brands may evoke, it's not unusual for companies to tweak recipes and ingredients over time. The Twinkies on shelves today, for example, have a shelf life of about 45 days, which is nearly three weeks longer than a year ago.

Flowers said Wonder bread is being made at that company's existing plants. The 20 Hostess plants the company acquired as part of the deal were closed, Aldredge said.

The company says the bread is being distributed in the areas where Flowers currently distributes its products, with hopes of expanding over time.

Flowers Foods, based in Thomasville, Ga., says it reaches about three quarters of the country.


Wonder Bread maker in the midst of liquidation, looking to sell bread brands: report

NEW YORK -- The makers of Thomas' English muffins and Tastykake snacks are emerging as two of the bidders for Wonder Bread and other Hostess bread brands as the company tries to sell off its assets under bankruptcy-court oversight, a newspaper reported Saturday.

The Wall Street Journal said Hostess Brands Inc. could reveal as early as next week that Flowers Foods Inc. and Grupo Bimbo SAB are in discussions to acquire its bread brands, which also include Nature's Pride. The report said the brands could command $350 million.

Grupo Bimbo's brands include Arnold breads, Thomas' English muffins and Entenmann's cakes. Flowers Foods Inc.'s brands include Nature's Own breads and Tastykake snacks.

Hostess sells Twinkies, Ding Dongs and Ho Hos, along with Dolly Madison cakes, which includes Coffee Cakes and Zingers. Hostess also sells Devil Dogs, Funny Bones, and Yodels under the Drake's brand.

Hostess, which is based in Irving, Texas, announced in November that it was shutting down its business and selling its bread, snacks and cakes brands along with its 33 bakeries and other operations.

The company's demise came after years of management turmoil and turnover. Workers said the company failed to invest in updating its snack cakes and breads. Hostess filed for its second bankruptcy protection in less than a decade last year, citing steep costs associated with its unionized workforce.

The company was able to reach a new contract agreement with its largest union, the Teamsters, but the bakers union rejected the terms and went on strike Nov. 9. A week later, Hostess announced its plans to liquidate, saying the strike crippled its ability to maintain normal production. In 2011, the company's revenue was $2.5 billion.

Hostess declined to comment, as did Grupo Bimbo's U.S. division, Bimbo Bakeries USA. Bimbo's parent company is headquartered in Mexico. A message left with Flowers Foods, which is based in Thomasville, Georgia, was not immediately returned.

Hostess said in bankruptcy court proceedings in December that it was narrowing down the bids it had received and that it expects to sell off its snack cakes and bread brands to different buyers.

Hostess said in December that it expects to file binding bids for many of its brands this month, followed by a four-week auction process to allow competing bids. Closings for many brands could come as soon as mid-March, according to Joshua Scherer of Perella Weinberg Partners, which is advising Hostess.

An attorney for Hostess said in court in December that 1,100 employees had been retained to shut down plants and perform other tasks as it winds down its operations. The liquidation of the company will ultimately mean the loss of 18,000 jobs, not including those shed in the years leading to the company's failure.


Flowers Foods Sued by Drivers Over Employee Status

The lawsuits come as independent drivers in several sectors are challenging their status in courts around the country.

Erica E. Phillips

Flowers Foods Inc., FLO 0.08% the bakery that owns Wonder Bread, Nature’s Own and Tastykake brands, is being sued in more than a dozen states by truck drivers who claim they were improperly classified as independent contractors.

The lawsuits allege the company violated the federal Fair Labor Standards Act by classifying drivers on its delivery routes as contractors. The suits seek payment for overtime, employee benefits and other compensation. One of the earliest suits, brought in North Carolina in 2012, was granted class-action status in March, after which 15 more were filed in other states. The most recent suit was brought on Thursday in Texas, bringing the total to 18.

If the company loses in court, Flowers would likely need to buy back drivers’ routes and trucks, said Tim Ramey, an analyst with Pivotal Research Group. However, it could be years before the cases are resolved, other analysts say. Any ruling against Flowers would likely also affect its competitors, many of which also rely on independent drivers, said Eric Katzman, an analyst with Deutsche Bank.

“At some point in the distant future, it could be a financial risk but for the moment it’s just a headline risk,” Mr. Katzman said.

Top logistics news

The lawsuits come as independent drivers in various sectors have successfully challenged their status in courts around the country. Last year, FedEx Corp. agreed to pay $228 million in a settlement with thousands of its California drivers after the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals ruled they had been misclassified as independent contractors. Ride-hailing services Uber Technologies Inc. and Lyft Inc. have face similar claims from drivers

Last July, the Labor Department issued guidance suggesting businesses examine the issue of mis-classification and consider designating more of their independent contractors as employees.

In an email, Flowers said it doesn’t believe the lawsuits have legal merit, and that “the independent distribution model is a win-win where distributors, their customers, and the company benefit.”

Flowers Foods, a $3.7 billion company, is the second largest packaged bread producer in the U.S. after Grupo Bimbo S.A.B. de C.V. The company distributes its products to grocery stores and retailers such as Target Corp., Wal-Mart Stores Inc. and Dollar General Corp. Flowers has grown through acquisition, expanding its operations into more than 35 states. Last year, Flowers bought the Wonder Bread brand in the liquidation of Hostess Brands LLC.

Flowers has relied almost entirely on independent drivers since the 1980s. The company sells its delivery routes—often with a company-financed note—to drivers, who then have exclusive rights to sell and distribute Flowers products within that territory.

In their legal claims, drivers say their routes aren’t independent businesses because Flowers tells them what locations to service and sets pricing and procedures directly with the retailers.

In court documents the company has said drivers are exempt from the FLSA because they engage in interstate commerce. In its statement, Flowers said their program “has been upheld as an independent contractor model in the past when similar claims were brought in various legal forums.”

Flowers shares traded at $20.40 Friday afternoon in New York, up 2%. The company’s stock traded above $27 a share in November.

Write to Erica E. Phillips at [email protected]

Copyright ©2020 Dow Jones & Company, Inc. All Rights Reserved. 87990cbe856818d5eddac44c7b1cdeb8


As Hostess seeking bankruptcy court approval to sell assets, Twinkies are likely to live on

DETROIT - The tasty cream-filled golden spongecakes known as Twinkies are likely to survive, even though their maker will be sold in bankruptcy court.

Hostess Brands Inc., baker of Wonder Bread as well as Twinkies, Ding Dongs and Ho Ho's, will be in a New York bankruptcy courtroom Monday to start the process of selling itself.

The company, weighed down by debt, management turmoil, rising labour costs and the changing tastes of America, decided on Friday that it no longer could make it through a conventional Chapter 11 bankruptcy restructuring. Instead, it's asking the court for permission to sell assets and go out of business.

But with high brand recognition and $2.5 billion in revenue per year, other companies are interested in bidding for at least pieces of Hostess. Twinkies alone have brought in $68 million in revenue so far this year, which would look good to another snack-maker.

"There's a huge amount of goodwill with the commercial brand name," said John Pottow, a University of Michigan Law School professor who specializes in bankruptcy. "It's quite conceivable that they can sell the name and recipe for Twinkies to a company that wants to make them."

Hostess has said it's received inquiries about buying parts of the company. But spokesman Lance Ignon would not comment on analysts' reports that Thomasville, Ga.-based Flowers Foods Inc. and private equity food investment firm Metropoulos & Co. are likely suitors. Metropoulos owns Pabst Brewing Co., while Flowers Foods makes Nature's Own bread, Tastykake treats and other baked goods. Messages were left for spokesmen for both companies on Sunday.

"We think there's a lot of value in the brands, and we'll certainly be trying to maximize value, both of the brands and the physical assets," Ignon said Sunday. He said it's possible some of Hostess' bakeries will never return to operation because the industry has too much bakery capacity.

Little will be decided at Monday afternoon's hearing before Bankruptcy Judge Robert Drain, Pottow said. The judge eventually will appoint a company that specializes in liquidation to sell the assets, and the sale probably will take six months to a year to complete, Pottow said.

Irving, Texas-based Hostess filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection in January for the second time in less than a decade. Its predecessor company, Interstate Bakeries, sought bankruptcy protection in 2004 and changed its name to Hostess after emerging in 2009.

The company said it was saddled with costs related to its unionized workforce. The company had been contributing $100 million a year in pension costs for workers the new contract offer would've slashed that to $25 million a year, in addition to wage cuts and a 17 per cent reduction in health benefits.

Management missteps were another problem. Hostess came under fire this spring after it was revealed that nearly a dozen executives received pay hikes of up to 80 per cent last year even as the company was struggling.

Then last week thousands of members of the Bakery, Confectionery, Tobacco Workers and Grain Millers International Union went on strike after rejecting the company's latest contract offer. The bakers union represents about 30 per cent of the company's workforce.

By that time, the company had reached a contract agreement with its largest union, the International Brotherhood of Teamsters, which this week urged the bakery union to hold a secret ballot on whether to continue striking. Although many bakery workers decided to cross picket lines this week, Hostess said it wasn't enough to keep operations at normal levels.

The company filed a motion to liquidate Friday. The shuttering means the loss of about 18,500 jobs. Hostess said employees at its 33 factories were sent home and operations suspended. Its roughly 500 bakery outlet stores will stay open for several days to sell remaining products.

News of the decision caused a run on Hostess snacks at many stores around the country, and the snacks started appearing on the Internet at inflated prices.

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Boko Haram leader behind kidnapping of 300 girls seriously injured after trying to blow himself up

The notorious leader of Islamist terror group Boko Haram, Abubakar Shekau, has been seriously injured with some reporting he is dead after trying to blow himself up, according to intelligence sources. Shekau, the man behind the Chibok schoolgirl kidnapping in 2014, tried to kill himself to avoid capture when a rival group supported by the Islamic State surrounded him on Wednesday, sources told AFP. In a confidential briefing leaked to Nigerian media and seen by The Daily Telegraph, the country's intelligence services said: "Shekau detonated a bomb and killed himself when he observed that the ISWAP fighters wanted to capture him alive." But an intelligence source told AFP Shekau had managed to escape with some men after the attack. In 2016, men from Boko Haram defected to create a splinter group, known as Islamic State West Africa Province (ISWAP). While Shekau revelled in indiscriminate brutality, ISWAP refused to kill Muslim civilians in a ploy to more successfuly recruit from local communities. Bulama Bukarti, a Boko Haram specialist at the Tony Blair Institute for Global Change, told The Telegraph that if confirmed, Shekau's death would be "a huge milestone, a turning point in Boko Haram's history." "If his death exacerbates the infighting, it means more killings on both sides and that would be positive news for counterterrorism. If his death leads to the reunification of Boko Haram, then it will become a unified force and they will continue to pursue civilian-friendly policy." The brutal leader has been reported dead several times in the past, but each time he has issued statements or videos to rebut the claims. The cleric became the group's leader in 2010 and launched a sadistic campaign of terror across the Lake Chad region into southern Niger, northern Cameroon and Chad. Hamstrung by low morale, a lack of resources and decades of corruption, the Nigerian military struggled to stop Boko Haram's advance. "Shekau defied the Nigerian armed forces for 12 years, if it's true it speaks volumes about how alarmingly powerful ISWAP is," Mr Bukarti added. Despite frequent declarations of victory by the Nigerian government, Boko Haram and their breakaway group, ISWAP, have proved extraordinarily resilient. Reportedly, the jihadists have killed thousands of local soldiers over the last two years. More than 40,000 people have been killed and over two million have fled their homes due to the conflict in northeast Nigeria. Fighting has spread to parts of neighbouring Chad, Cameroon and Niger.

Drew Barrymore recalled once greeting Hugh Grant by kissing him for 10 minutes straight

Drew Barrymore and Hugh Grant spoke about the incident on Barrymore's chat show, recalling how the producers with them didn't know what to make of it.


Watch the video: Hostess employees protest at Wonder Bread plant (November 2021).